Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Fashion’

More Potato Chips!  With button holes and buttons, no less!   Like with the edible variety of chips, you can’t stop at one!  🙂

Margaret L. Been, 2012

Read Full Post »

I foresee a day coming when people will turn around and walk the other way when they see me approaching—for fear that I’ll corner them and start telling them about the Potato Chip Scarf.  They’ll say, “Yikes!  Here she comes, charging inexorably toward us with Potato Chips wound around her neck.”

Oh well, at the risk of driving non-knitting readers stark raving batty, I can’t resist posting my latest finished “masterpiece”—this time a Potato Chip not joined at the ends, so the curves and bends dangle and wave in the breeze.  A lampshade seemed like a suitable model. 

Obviously, when I latch on to a good thing, I just don’t let go.  Fashion scarves are so much fun, economical to make, and abounding in creative possibilities with all the gorgeous and funky yarns available.  I do not see any end in sight—except for that ultimate end!  I may very well have knitting needles in my hands and a ball of yarn dangling from me when the Lord takes me home!

Thinking of the scarves and shawls I hope to make, I recalled something from the 1940s which was “the latest thing” in the small town where I lived:  a lacy triangular scarf called a Fascinator.  These came in lovely pastel shades, and they were available at the dress shop in our town for the hefty price of $2.00 each.  Joe says that would be about $28.00 in today’s money.

I remember saving and saving to buy my sister, Ardis, a Fascinator for a Christmas gift.  I am not sure those small town doozeys were haute couture in Madison, where Ardis attended the University of Wisconsin.  But she was gracious about my gift, and I’m sure she loved the thought!  An 18 year old and a 10 year old are worlds apart in what they consider to be smart and chic apparel—at least that was the case back in 1943.

Just for fun, I looked up “Fascinator” on Wikipedia and learned the following:

“A fascinator is a headpiece, a style of millinery.  The word originally referred to a fine, lacy head covering akin to a shawl and made from wool or lace, but mostly feathers.  Today, a fascinator may be worn instead of a hat on occasions where hats were traditionally worn—such as weddings—or as an evening accessory, when it may be called a cocktail hat.  It is generally worn with fairly formal attire.

“A substantial fascinator is a fascinator of some size or bulk.  They have been mentioned in the press, due to Queen Elizabeth pronouncing new standards of dress required for entry to the Royal Enclosure at Royal Ascot.  In 2012 Royal Ascot announced that Women will have to wear hats, not fascinators, as part of a tightening of the dress code in Royal Ascot’s Royal Enclosure this summer.  In previous years, female racegoers were simply advised that ‘many ladies wear hats’.

“Bigger than a barette, modern fascinators are commonly made with feathers, flowers, or beads.  They attach to the hair by a comb, headband, or clip.  The fun, fanciful ornament is often embellished with crystals, beads, or loops of ribbon, and attaches via a comb or headband; some have a small, stiff, flat base that can be secured with bobby pins.  They are particularly popular at premium horse-racing events such as the Grand National, Kentucky, Derby, and the Melbourne Cup.  Brides may choose to wear them as an alternative to a bridal veil or hat, particularly if their gowns are non-traditional.”

So the 1940s lacy headgear sold in my small town dress shop was a replay of the age old Fascinator in one form.  I could easily knit something similar to what I remember giving my sister for Christmas.  But I have to admit that the spin-offs pictured above are also “fascinating” to me.  I probably would not wear one to church.  But I think it would be great fun to prance around at the local super market, or in my favorite antique malls, wearing a Fascinator that looks like a combination peacock in full dress and a hyper-active ceiling fan!

Margaret L. Been, ©2012

Read Full Post »